Archive | Growing Old is Not for Sissies

Loners Like Alone Time

Some people live alone due to circumstances in their life, for example, the death of a spouse, divorce, being a single parent when the last child moves out of the house, etc. Other people truly like to be alone. George Harrison’s first song, written in 1963, was titled “Don’t Bother Me” and famously contains the […]

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In the current time of forced social distancing, it seems that some people have quickly become more distant than others.  I think of friends who live alone and who, most of the time are happy or comfortable with it.  But, forced isolation for many people has become more constricting.  Under “normal” or at least usual, […]

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Wellness Checks

Wellness checks is something normally thought about to only involve the “homebound” or the elderly, the sick, and the frail. Well, we’re all homebound now, in some way or another, and, while we may or may not be sick, elderly, or frail, we are cloistered in abnormal ways. Quarantine, sequestration, call it what you will, […]

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I am writing this post approximately one month into our social distancing, isolation, quarantine, and solitary confinement situations.  I am a person who has a lot of friends, but as of today, only ONE of my friends, including long time, childhood friends, has contacted me to check on my well being. (This doesn’t include people […]

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Writing an Obituary

In the midst of the worldwide pandemic caused by COVID-19, life goes on. And, life, for some people, ends. Many people are, of course, dying from the virus but many other people are dying from other causes. It was against this backdrop of COVID-19 that I received a phone call on Monday, April 6, 2020 […]

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I’ve not been asked to handle the task of writing an obituary, or providing a eulogy at a funeral – something Melissa has also done on more than one occasion.  But, I will add to the tribute to Russ Jones.  Way back when Melissa was teaching at UNF, I had a number of occasions to […]

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COVID-19 By the Numbers: Part 3 – Questions

The preceding posts on Fear and Hope related to COVID-19 numbers led me to this post. The numbers we are being given should raise questions. Clearly, we are not being given full information and that worsens the tremendous uncertainty of this pandemic. Following are some questions that I have. When did this virus really start? […]

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David has a lot of questions, none of which are easily answered.  I doubt we will ever know the answers to many of the questions on everyone’s minds, for example, the date on which the COVID-19 virus was first discovered.  I have read countless articles about its origin, including that COVID-19 was discovered 15 years […]

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Things We Can Do While Wearing a Mask

Let me begin by saying I intensely dislike being told what to do. Being told what to do, as opposed to being asked what to do (the more politely, the better) has never been one of my strengths. And, when someone tells me that I have to do something for my own good, such as […]

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It has been interesting as we have collectively adapted, some kicking and screaming, to the pandemic crisis.  Masks were a later adaptation with lots of mixed messages.  On one particular day, I heard the U.S. Surgeon General recommended masks and the Florida Surgeon General said they don’t help.  Or, maybe it was vice versa; that […]

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COVID-19 By the Numbers: Part 2 – Hope

To have hope in dealing with COVID-19, one must have perspective. Perspective comes from knowing other numbers. For example, the flu kills 100 people a day in the U.S. (more or less, depending on source). Most people are unaware of the rate at which other diseases kill. Here is a sample (based on numbers from […]

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David has created some interesting charts designed to give the readers of this blog some hope for the future when we resume our lives.  Although I, like everyone else, hope we will return to “normal” soon, I believe normal will be different from what normal used to be, in the good old days before COVID-19 […]

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COVID-19 By the Numbers: Part 1 – Fear

As we are all experiencing the COVID-19 pandemic, we are bombarded with numbers. Working with data, i.e., numbers, is a way of life for Melissa and me. Because of that, I’ve been frustrated from day 1 that, while we are being given some numbers, we are not being given others. Further, some of the “numbers […]

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Interpreting statistical data is not for the faint hearted.  I should know; I have both taken and taught courses in statistics. I use statistics on a regular basis at work. (SPSS, anyone?)  For the most part, the average person cannot begin to understand statistics.  For many people, understanding mathematics is a challenge and, based on […]

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Twilight Zone

A Point of View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On April 16, 2020

Category: Getting Through Life and Work, Growing Old is Not for Sissies, Life Outside of Work, Mental Health, Psychology, Work-Life

“Help, I’m steppin’ into the twilight zone” go the lyrics of the 1982 song by Golden Earring. The twilight zone, where things are not as they seem, was envisioned, and brought to the small and big screen, by the imagination of Rod Serling. I hear this song in my head each time I enter the […]

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Another View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On April 16, 2020

Category: Getting Through Life and Work, Growing Old is Not for Sissies, Life Outside of Work, Mental Health, Psychology, Work-Life

Dementia is a strange disease that plays strange tricks on the minds of those who suffer from it, and sometimes, on the minds of those who interact with dementia patients.  Based on my education as a psychologist, as well as my experience with family members and friends who suffer from dementia and mental illness, I […]

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Herman’s Army

A Point of View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On February 27, 2020

Category: Getting Through Life and Work, Giving Back, Growing Old is Not for Sissies, Life Outside of Work, Work-Life

This is another post in the series of “growing old is not for sissies.” The twists and turns of aging require frequent adjustments. For Dad, the last 6-8 months have involved many. Hospital, then rehab, then relocation to a new assisted living community, adjustments to new people at the new place, adjustments to his new […]

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Another View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On February 27, 2020

Category: Getting Through Life and Work, Giving Back, Growing Old is Not for Sissies, Life Outside of Work, Work-Life

David’s comments about all of the people involved in his parents’ care is another example of the phenomenon known as “it takes a village.”  In the case of frail, elderly parents, it is difficult for many families to assume a care giving role, particularly if family members live out of town, are employed, and/or have […]

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Traits of Mom’s wheelchair helpers

A Point of View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On September 3, 2019

Category: Common Courtesy, Getting Through Life and Work, Growing Old is Not for Sissies, Life Outside of Work, Psychology

As with many illnesses, including some types of dementia, the ability to ambulate declines until the patient is unable to walk. My mother had a form of dementia, known as Pick’s Disease, that caused a regression in her ability to ambulate on her own, to walking with a cane, to walking with a four pronged […]

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Another View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On September 3, 2019

Category: Common Courtesy, Getting Through Life and Work, Growing Old is Not for Sissies, Life Outside of Work, Psychology

Melissa reported these encounters with angels to me in real time. It was surprising to her and her Mom, as well as to me, at first. But, then it came to be something of a curiosity as to what story I’d hear her tell next. I don’t think we had many offers of help when […]

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