Archive | Jury consultants

Britt

My first professional job upon earning my Ph.D. in social psychology was Director of Marketing Research at Baptist Medical Center in Jacksonville, Florida. My job duties were to analyze the attitudes, opinions, and beliefs of all the hospitals’ constituents: (1) patients; (2) the community at large (the hospital’s source of patients); (3) the medical staff; […]

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I remember Britt as smiling, cheerful, and a true southern gentleman.  The photo I took of him had him showing off his suspenders under his suit coat.  I don’t know if Britt ever wore the pink lady jacket that the few men who were volunteers were expected to wear at that time, but he was […]

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Take Notes

Having been a student from the time I was 4 years old until I earned my Ph.D. at the age of 26, I learned how to take notes to document the important things in my life. My note taking abilities have served me well in my career. I have calendars dating back almost 40 years; […]

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As we have written, many of these posts are at least partially inspired by our experience as employers. By way of background, I fully agree with Melissa about the importance of note taking, though my notes are usually more cryptic and abbreviated than hers. (I don’t know how she does it the way she does, […]

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When to memorize

There are many things in life that do not require memorization, such as complicated mathematical and statistical formulas that can be looked up or nowadays, calculated by a computer. In addition, there are some things that used to be memorized by most people, such as frequently dialed telephone numbers, which are now programmed into speed […]

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I once took a memory class in Jacksonville, Florida by a local memory expert named John Currie. Currie gave seminars on memorizing things, especially names and faces. His “trick” was to suggest that one form a picture using the name as tied to the face. I found this trick moderately helpful; I was not as […]

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Power of Words: Plantation ≠ big farm

This post is third in a series of posts about David’s and my experiences in the Mississippi Delta. We had fun times, but as usual, we learned some unexpected things from people we met during our trip. One of Magnus’ long time and favorite clients is named Orman Kimbrough. Orman is a native of Greenwood, […]

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Sometimes it is the “little” surprises that happen while traveling that are the most memorable.  I, too, found the plantation/big farm revelation mind opening.  It is also a reminder about the evolution of language.  The “de-sexisming” of language seems to have mostly evolved.  Gone are mailman, stewardess, chairman of the board, replaced with the gender […]

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Cliques

I recently authored a post about poseurs. This is post is on a closely related topic, cliques. Cliques are present in almost all social groups. Social psychologists have, for decades, conducted research on in groups versus out groups and the societal roles played by these categorizations of people. Generally speaking, we humans prefer to socialize […]

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Other than being in the band, marching and concert, for much of junior and senior high, I don’t think I found myself in too many cliques.  And, I’ll report that, even within the unit of the band, there were sub cliques of those who thought they were the best of the bunch.  While I was […]

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Porch dogs (& cats)

A Point of View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On March 28, 2017

Category: Getting through life and work, Jury consultants, Life Outside of Work, Trial Consulting, Work-Life

I have a well worn tee shirt that says, “If you can’t run with the big dogs, you’d better stay on the porch.” Although I like this expression, I prefer my porch to almost any other location, thus, I am perfectly happy to stay on the porch. I believe there are several types of people, […]

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Another View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On March 28, 2017

Category: Getting through life and work, Jury consultants, Life Outside of Work, Trial Consulting, Work-Life

To answer Melissa’s question, my preference is to be an outdoors person. But, the reality is, I spend more time on the porch than in the field. Growing up, I spent as much time as possible exploring the woods near my house, pellet gun in hand, before moving beyond that to bigger woods and bigger […]

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Smile at people

A Point of View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On January 31, 2017

Category: Common Courtesy, Getting through life and work, Jury consultants, Life Outside of Work, litigation consultants, Trial Consulting

I took a women’s self defense class with friend of mine. I learned many valuable things that I have put into practice since then. I also learned that my education and skills as a social psychologist have been paying off as they apply to my interactions with strangers, including those who might have an intent […]

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I sometimes have to cogitate on these posts before writing, especially when responding as 2nd blogger. This topic is one of those so I read Melissa’s writing and then I have been thinking about it. Part of that thinking about it has been to pay attention to people on the street. Do they smile? Do […]

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I Don’t Care about Research

This post was inspired by a recent encounter I had with a young, inexperienced attorney who told me she did not care about research results; instead, she preferred to base her decisions on her past experiences.  Wow!  Hearing this statement was shocking, in and of itself, but hearing it from a young person was, in […]

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Sticking one’s head in the sand and digging in one’s heels when faced with new information  are two bad behaviors.  Melissa related this story to me upon her return from the courtroom and it amazes me as much as it does her.  I don’t know whether it is because this attorney is young, and as […]

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Drive your own car

A Point of View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On January 10, 2017

Category: Getting through life and work, Jury consultants, Life Outside of Work, litigation consultants, Trial Consulting, Work-Life

A facet of growing up in a small town was that it was safe to get in a car and ride to just about any destination with a new friend, including on a first date.  As I mentioned in a previous post, my family and I knew everyone I was destined to become friends with, […]

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Another View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On January 10, 2017

Category: Getting through life and work, Jury consultants, Life Outside of Work, litigation consultants, Trial Consulting, Work-Life

Melissa drove her own car, a bright red Camaro, when we first went out for dinner, movies, or other dates. I don’t know how long it was before she decided to let me pick her up and yes, it seemed strange to me for her to be so cautious. But, as I learned about her […]

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Crazy Mock Juror Story #3: Shopping Spree

A Point of View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On December 6, 2016

Category: Jury consultants, litigation consultants, Litigation Tips, Psychology, Trial Consulting

When scheduling mock jury research, I deliberately search for boring places where we can work without distraction. Sometimes, this is not possible, however, I try hard not to work in hotels or market research facilities with tempting amenities. Tempting amenities provide too many distractions for our mock jurors (and sometimes, to our clients) that have […]

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Another View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On December 6, 2016

Category: Jury consultants, litigation consultants, Litigation Tips, Psychology, Trial Consulting

It is frustrating how much time, and shoe leather, is wasted searching by these oblivious souls. We were all sweating this one, it was a big case, with the head of a major law firm as lead lawyer and the head the firm’s litigation department as the “opposing” lawyer for the day. Plus, their clients […]

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