Archive | Trial Consulting

Force Feeding Employees

A Point of View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On September 18, 2014

Category: Business personalities, Careers, Employment, Litigation Tips, Managing Employees, Small Business Success, Trial Consulting, Workplace Technology

Force feeding certainly has a negative connotation and perhaps isn’t the best connotation in a work environment.  But, sometimes you have to really push employees to do things and to do them in a way you, their boss, want them done.  In recent years, one of the things I have had to force has been […]

Continue Reading

The older I get, and the more experience I have as a social psychologist, the younger and more inexperienced my employees appear to me. Work tasks they are completing for the first time are often tasks I have been performing for decades. Things that are second nature to me are sometimes difficult for them. Because […]

Continue Reading

Be smart, but act clever

A Point of View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On July 2, 2014

Category: Business personalities, Careers, Employment, Getting the Job Done, Small Business Success, Trial Consulting

A long time ago, when I first began my career as a jury/trial consultant, my very tough minded boss told me something that has always resonated with me as I have pursued my long career. He said, “The clients know you/we are smart, after all, we all have Ph. D.s, but what you/we must always […]

Continue Reading

Another View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On July 2, 2014

Category: Business personalities, Careers, Employment, Getting the Job Done, Small Business Success, Trial Consulting

Being clever as a trial consultant requires the ability to view the case issues from perspectives beyond those of the clients.  Time and time again clients tell us they had never thought of their cases in the ways we helped them see the case.  These clever insights come from being attuned to both the reactions […]

Continue Reading

Benchmarks for Lawyers, part 2

A Point of View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On June 25, 2014

Category: Getting the Job Done, Litigation Tips, Small Business Success, Trial Consulting

When writing part 1 of the post on benchmarks, it occurred to me that some people might ask if there are other benchmarks for service businesses/practices.  In fact, we have been asked many times over the past 20+ years about our “success rate.”  This is always a difficult question to answer because the answer, as […]

Continue Reading

Another View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On June 25, 2014

Category: Getting the Job Done, Litigation Tips, Small Business Success, Trial Consulting

David mentioned the benchmark of client satisfaction as an indicator of our success on a particular case. As in any service based business, Magnus’ satisfied clients are the best source of revenue for our business.  The primary way we have always obtained new cases on which to consult is from past clients whom we helped […]

Continue Reading

Benchmarks for Lawyers, part 1

A Point of View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On June 20, 2014

Category: Getting the Job Done, Litigation Tips, Trial Consulting

In the business world, the concept of benchmarks is well understood.  A benchmark is a way to measure productivity and performance.  A benchmark may take the form of a production or sales quota.  But, when dealing with performance in a service based practice – trial consulting or practicing as a lawyer – conceiving of benchmarks […]

Continue Reading

Another View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On June 20, 2014

Category: Getting the Job Done, Litigation Tips, Trial Consulting

Many attorneys have asked me to provide a list of cases on which I have worked that proved the case outcome was improved due to my and my company’s involvement.  As David points out, there is are no available means for me to provide this information because I do not know what would have happened […]

Continue Reading

Bargaining

A Point of View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On May 20, 2014

Category: Business Partnerships, Getting the Job Done, Managing Employees, Partnerships, Trial Consulting, Work-Life

As a social psychologist, I possess expertise in bargaining and negotiation that surpasses laypersons’ commonsense knowledge about these topics. (Bargaining and negotiation are often the subjects of an entire textbook in both undergraduate and graduate social psychology classes; I have taught both.) Knowledge of bargaining and negotiation is more important in everyday life than in […]

Continue Reading

Another View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On May 20, 2014

Category: Business Partnerships, Getting the Job Done, Managing Employees, Partnerships, Trial Consulting, Work-Life

The key in any bargaining is determining what is really important, both overall, and to the other individual.  And, bargaining is a skill important to many aspects of life; few of us can just demand to get things our way and have it happen (unless maybe one is Donald Trump or perhaps a federal judge). […]

Continue Reading

Introverts

A Point of View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On May 13, 2014

Category: Business personalities, Careers, Employment, Getting the Job Done, Managing Employees, Small Business Success, Trial Consulting

My spouse/business partner and I are introverts. It may be a common assumption to assume most entrepreneurs are gregarious, outgoing, extroverts, however, the reality is entrepreneurs come in all sizes, shapes, and types, just like the general population. As introverts, it takes a long time for my partner and me to “warm up” to strangers, […]

Continue Reading

It is difficult for me to socialize on the “cocktail party” or even lunch/dinner circuit.  But, networking through these means has been important in the development of Magnus’ business.  The key for me is meeting one or more like minded person and using that person as a “wing person” through which to meet more and […]

Continue Reading

Do Attorneys Make Excellent Jury Consultants?

A Point of View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On May 6, 2014

Category: Trial Consulting

The philosophy of, “anything someone else can do, I can do better” resonates with some attorneys, who truly believe they can do just as good a job, if not a better job, working as a jury consultant than most, if not all, jury consultants. Some attorneys, after having had negative experiences with a particular jury […]

Continue Reading

Another View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On May 6, 2014

Category: Trial Consulting

Melissa has never been accused of being subtle in her opinions.  What is driving this blog are some recent observations she and I have had about the expansion of do it yourself mock jury research into some of these do it yourselfers turning into for hire jury consultants.  The do it yourself model might be […]

Continue Reading

Freak Spotter

A Point of View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On March 17, 2014

Category: Business personalities, Careers, Employment, Trial Consulting

My spouse/business partner and I recently were conducting employment interviews.  One of the candidates took exception to some aspects of the job application, which is a standard form we always use for all applicants.  After assuring him that we were not trying to steal his identity, we had a good interview, but Melissa, the psychologist, […]

Continue Reading

Another View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On March 17, 2014

Category: Business personalities, Careers, Employment, Trial Consulting

I am a social psychologist and an expert on judging and predicting human behavior.  In fact, my job is comprised almost exclusively of judging and predicting human behavior and the company I co-own with my spouse exists solely because I possess the education, knowledge, skills, and expertise in determining how people will act.  Time and […]

Continue Reading

Something WILL Go Wrong

A Point of View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On March 10, 2014

Category: Careers, Employment, Getting the Job Done, Managing Employees, Travel, Trial Consulting, Workplace Technology

My spouse/business partner and I strive for excellence, if not perfection, in everything we do on behalf of our clients, our employees, and ourselves. This is a noble aspiration, however, people and situations being what they are, invariably and despite our best efforts and intentions, something goes wrong. Our jury research exercises involve travel, often […]

Continue Reading

Another View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On March 10, 2014

Category: Careers, Employment, Getting the Job Done, Managing Employees, Travel, Trial Consulting, Workplace Technology

The “something” which goes wrong can be painful, a big problem, or, more frequently something which is less obvious. It is critical to keep one’s cool when things go wrong – as in “don’t let them see you sweat.” But, that is sometimes easier said than done. For us as managers, it has been important […]

Continue Reading

Powered by: BARD Marketing