Archive | Giving Back

Racial Attitudes in America

Racial Attitudes in America is a scholarly book published in 1972 and written by Dr. John C. “Jack” Brigham. Dr. Brigham is not only one of the most highly regarded social psychologists in the world, he is my major professor. (For non academic readers of this post, a major professor is the primary professor of […]

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Little did I know, when I met Melissa, how immersed in the world of psychology, specifically social psychology, I would become.  It has been quite an education, and a positive one at that!  I took psychology 101, and another psychology course or two in college; more in grad school.  But, my real psychological education has […]

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Loners Like Alone Time

Some people live alone due to circumstances in their life, for example, the death of a spouse, divorce, being a single parent when the last child moves out of the house, etc. Other people truly like to be alone. George Harrison’s first song, written in 1963, was titled “Don’t Bother Me” and famously contains the […]

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In the current time of forced social distancing, it seems that some people have quickly become more distant than others.  I think of friends who live alone and who, most of the time are happy or comfortable with it.  But, forced isolation for many people has become more constricting.  Under “normal” or at least usual, […]

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Wellness Checks

Wellness checks is something normally thought about to only involve the “homebound” or the elderly, the sick, and the frail. Well, we’re all homebound now, in some way or another, and, while we may or may not be sick, elderly, or frail, we are cloistered in abnormal ways. Quarantine, sequestration, call it what you will, […]

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I am writing this post approximately one month into our social distancing, isolation, quarantine, and solitary confinement situations.  I am a person who has a lot of friends, but as of today, only ONE of my friends, including long time, childhood friends, has contacted me to check on my well being. (This doesn’t include people […]

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Writing an Obituary

In the midst of the worldwide pandemic caused by COVID-19, life goes on. And, life, for some people, ends. Many people are, of course, dying from the virus but many other people are dying from other causes. It was against this backdrop of COVID-19 that I received a phone call on Monday, April 6, 2020 […]

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I’ve not been asked to handle the task of writing an obituary, or providing a eulogy at a funeral – something Melissa has also done on more than one occasion.  But, I will add to the tribute to Russ Jones.  Way back when Melissa was teaching at UNF, I had a number of occasions to […]

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Things We Can Do While Wearing a Mask

Let me begin by saying I intensely dislike being told what to do. Being told what to do, as opposed to being asked what to do (the more politely, the better) has never been one of my strengths. And, when someone tells me that I have to do something for my own good, such as […]

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It has been interesting as we have collectively adapted, some kicking and screaming, to the pandemic crisis.  Masks were a later adaptation with lots of mixed messages.  On one particular day, I heard the U.S. Surgeon General recommended masks and the Florida Surgeon General said they don’t help.  Or, maybe it was vice versa; that […]

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Herman’s Army

A Point of View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On February 27, 2020

Category: Getting Through Life and Work, Giving Back, Growing Old is Not for Sissies, Life Outside of Work, Work-Life

This is another post in the series of “growing old is not for sissies.” The twists and turns of aging require frequent adjustments. For Dad, the last 6-8 months have involved many. Hospital, then rehab, then relocation to a new assisted living community, adjustments to new people at the new place, adjustments to his new […]

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Another View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On February 27, 2020

Category: Getting Through Life and Work, Giving Back, Growing Old is Not for Sissies, Life Outside of Work, Work-Life

David’s comments about all of the people involved in his parents’ care is another example of the phenomenon known as “it takes a village.”  In the case of frail, elderly parents, it is difficult for many families to assume a care giving role, particularly if family members live out of town, are employed, and/or have […]

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I spend more time with lawyers than psychologists/colleagues

I have been a social psychologist for my entire career, however, my occupation has not been in the traditional trajectory within my field. Most social psychologists are university professors. In fact, it is somewhat frowned upon for social psychologists to work in occupations outside academia. My major professor has always looked down upon my work […]

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Melissa has introduced me to more psychologists, and types of psychologists, than I ever knew existed when we first met.  At that time, I was hanging around colleagues in my world of photography.  While the photographers were visually creative, I came to learn and appreciate the creative minds of her psychology colleagues.  Their conceptualization of […]

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Whistleblowing isn’t easy

Much has been in the news lately about people blowing whistles on allegations of corruption and abuse. Without discussing these specific situations, I want to address the act of sounding an alarm, or blowing a whistle. I have written something on this previously, but it warrants revisiting. I will start by saying that, if you […]

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To the uninitiated, whistle blower means the same thing as tattletale.  In fact, dictionary definitions of both terms list them as synonyms, along with others, such as betrayer, informant, nark, rat fink, and snitch.  In my view, there are different circumstances that lead to the characterization of people who “tell on” others.  For example, in […]

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Pro bono work – why do it

In the almost 30 years David and I have owned and operated Magnus Research Consultants, we have been privileged to work on several high profile pro bono cases. Pro bono means “for the public good” and it is usually performed by attorneys for free, that is, at no cost to their clients. Many lawyers are […]

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The pro bono cases on which we’ve worked have been some of the most personally rewarding cases we have handled.  While the intellectual rewards of the work we do are often felt, in these cases, it has been something special.  The cases have been unique, cases with questions no one has had to answer previously, […]

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The Joy of Photography, Part 2

Picking up where I left off about the joy of photography, there are at least 2 more, somewhat related, primary sources of joy in photography. The first is in taking the photos. As an aside, it is interesting to me that different terms are used for this part of photography – “taking a photograph” and […]

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Recently, David and I went on a “dream vacation” to Great Britain, the land of The Beatles, with two longtime friends.  All of us shared photos with each other, resulting in over 10,000 photos among us!  While David took professional quality photos with real (and real expensive) cameras, the rest of us busied ourselves taking […]

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