Archive | Jury Behavior

Window of Opportunity for Trial Consulting Work

Recently I’ve received calls from attorneys who wanted mock jury research on their cases, but the calls have come so late that I have been reflecting on when the window of opportunity is open for mock jury research. I have mentioned this issue in other posts, but because I’m noticing this recent spate of last […]

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Attorneys and social psychologists share few personality traits. Different types of people are, of course, drawn to different occupations. Social psychology is a research based doctoral degree; as such, it attracts people who are detail oriented; mathematically inclined; proactive; possessive of highly advanced logical reasoning skills; capable of designing, executing, and analyzing complex research programs; […]

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How NOT to do mock jury research!

I recently had a telephone call from a prospective client who wanted help with a case going to trial within 2 weeks of his call. It was a big case and he asked that we conduct mock trial research on a specific Saturday (which was 10 days after the call), in our home venue (despite […]

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No one hates to turn down work, and more important, revenue generated from work, more than David and I do. However, we have turned down quite a bit of work over the years, for a myriad of reasons. In the recent unfortunate instance David mentions, any of the incorrect and unreasonable requests the prospective client […]

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Jury Duty

A Point of View

David H. Fauss, M.S.M.

On February 2, 2017

Category: Jury Behavior, Jury Deliberations, Litigation Tips, Psychology, Trial Consulting, Trial Science

Jury duty is one of those things that brings up a groan from many people – not unlike the idea of going to a dentist. Of course, we at Magnus, and the clients we support, depend on jurors, or rather prospective jurors, to show up to participate when summoned. That, however, is not the focus […]

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Another View

Melissa Pigott, Ph.D.

On February 2, 2017

Category: Jury Behavior, Jury Deliberations, Litigation Tips, Psychology, Trial Consulting, Trial Science

I have lost count of the number of times people ask me how to “get off” jury duty. Despite knowing my occupation and perhaps, in spite of knowing my occupation, these individuals persist in believing I am going to tell them to look and/or act strangely, say ridiculous things, or provide them with other ways […]

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